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Category: Europe

Travel to Russia

Travel to Russia

The street musicians add energetic background music to the performance of the jokes, the lines of the cartoonists and the sellers who heel old uniforms, Soviet nostalgia and copies of Russian painting. On the side streets starting from Moscow’s longest pedestrian street, it smells of potato-filled pies and steaming hot beetroot soup, and the big department stores sell Gucci, Prada and other western brands. Much has changed in Russia, but here you can still experience not just one but several…

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Belarus Politics and Education

Belarus Politics and Education

Politics According to the constitution adopted on March 15, 1994 (revised several times), Belarus is a presidential republic. The head of state and commander-in-chief of the armed forces is the president, who is directly elected for a period of 5 years (one-time re-election possible). If none of the candidates receives an absolute majority in the first ballot, a runoff vote between the two most successful applicants is required in the second. A minimum participation of 50% is planned for both…

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Krakow, Poland

Krakow, Poland

Who the pearl of Poland to get to know is just right in Krakow. The city is the third largest city in the country and is considered the second largest science and cultural center in Poland. In the past time, Krakow was the capital of Poland for a long time, but also the seat of kings and coronation city. Krakow was declared a bishopric as early as 1000. In 1925 the city was promoted to the Archdiocese of Krakow. The…

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The Pope against the Populists Part II

The Pope against the Populists Part II

Opposite this is the pope’s many calls for hospitality and compassion for the refugees who came from another world. “We must open our eyes to their suffering, and free ourselves from our numbness when they, our brothers and sisters, arrive on our shores. Sending them back across the sea is a declaration of war, “said Pope Francis during a service. And on Twitter, the pope wrote: “Every stranger who knocks on our door gives us an opportunity to meet Christ.”…

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The Pope against the Populists Part I

The Pope against the Populists Part I

The pope’s fight against xenophobia has brought him to the brink of right-wing populist leaders. But does he have the support of the Catholics? Why do many people consider Pope Francis controversial? What do the pope and the Italian government disagree on? How is the Vatican affected by right-wing populism in Catholic countries? The Catholic Church is the world’s largest denomination, with nearly 1.3 billion members – around 17.5 percent of the world’s population. The current head of the church…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part III

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part III

As mentioned, the United Kingdom also wants to avoid the creation of an external border with physical checkpoints between Northern Ireland and the rest of Ireland, which will continue to be part of the EUas defined on timedictionary.com. This is important for economic reasons, as much trade takes place across this border, but also politically and security-wise, as it may challenge the peace agreement negotiated between Northern Ireland, Ireland and the United Kingdom in 1998. The EU has agreed to…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part II

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part II

The collaboration has developed in stages and through sometimes difficult negotiations. The process can in many ways be summed up by the fact that the collaboration has developed in breadth and depth: In the breadth of the fact that more and more policy areas have been incorporated into the collaboration. In depth, the Member States have transferred authority to the EU in some areas. As more policy areas have been incorporated into the co-operation, it has also been opened up…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part I

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part I

In just one year, ten countries joined the EU. The UK has now spent three years trying to opt out. Now the deadlock has caused the Prime Minister to withdraw. Why should it be so twisted? Why did the British choose to leave the EU? Why does it take so long to sign up? What does Brexit mean for the EU, and thus further cooperation in Europe? In a referendum in June 2016, the British voted for Britain to leave…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part IV

Germany after the 2009 Election Part IV

The mood in the EU was also weak in the autumn of 2005 after the French and Dutch had voted down the draft treaty treaty and the EU’s heads of state and government had failed to give the union a new long-term budget. At its first EU summit, Merkel managed to compromise on a long-term budget that both large and small EU countries could accept. During a very well-prepared German EU presidency in the spring of 2007, the Germans managed…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part III

Germany after the 2009 Election Part III

6: Stabilization, control and energy policy Merkel and the Grand Coalition went out early with government stabilization measures after the financial crisis unfolded in full from the autumn of 2008. Among other things, the German state quickly guaranteed all deposits in all German banks. This was criticized by other countries, who feared that many would move their bank deposits to German banks. Merkel also tried to support the German car industry by allowing the state to allocate large sums to…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part II

Germany after the 2009 Election Part II

Most parties are therefore increasingly fighting for the group that brought the German SPD back to power after 16 years in opposition in 1998 (under Chancellor Gerhard Schröder and the now defeated Steinmeier leadership): Die neue Mitte. However, voters in the “new center” do not reflect the Social Democrats’ traditional corps of voters. The SPD’s natural voters were the 20th century industrial proletariat with its political program welfare state, trade union rights and income equalization for trade unionized industrial workers….

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part I

Germany after the 2009 Election Part I

In a year full of anniversaries and celebrations, German voters have also gone to the polls – on several occasions. It is as if one of democracy’s foremost expressions – free elections – is contrasted with a backdrop of a German history with strong expressions to the contrary. Which political forces won during this year’s many elections? What do the elections mean for German politics and the economy in the future? What are the characteristics of German foreign and security…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part I

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part I

How can the economy of a developed nation collapse in a matter of days. How can a country that is rich one day, the next day have to seek help from its neighbors to secure the import of necessary goods? This happened in Iceland in the days 6. – 8. October 2008. There are explanations. Adam Smith – the father of market liberalism – was concerned as early as 1772. He called what has now happened “overtrading” and did not…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part II

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part II

In the autumn of 2007, the first signs came that a major crisis was brewing in the world economy. Share prices on stock exchanges around the world plummeted, but they recovered in most places. This did not apply to the stock exchange in Reykjavik, where the bank shares accounted for 80 per cent of the total share capital. The Icelandic bank bubble was about to burst. Foreign banks and investors wanted their money back, the krone exchange rate fell more…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part III

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part III

Against promises of high interest rates, for example, 450,000 private individuals in England, the Netherlands and Germany deposited their savings in accounts in Landsbanki’s online bank IceSave. Many were tempted by similarly high interest rates on Kaupthing Edge. In addition, 108 municipalities in England used IceSave, plus a number of police districts, hospitals and foundations. Much of this is lost money, because in retrospect it turned out that the Icesave not had any deposit guarantee in European countries – only…

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Germany 2009 Part III

Germany 2009 Part III

5: The dam burst On November 9, 1989, the dam burst. Politburo member Schabowski chatted – apparently due to confusion in the state leadership – when he at a press conference broadcast live on television to answer questions about exit rights. He interpreted the text on a note he had brought with him – after having been heavily beaten on the blade – as meaning that departure should apply without conditions – and with immediate effect. The time was 18.53….

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Germany 2009 Part II

Germany 2009 Part II

In addition, the fall in oil prices in 1986 hit the raw material supplier the Soviet Union hard. For the new leader of the Communist bloc, support for the aging and reform-minded communist leaders in Eastern and Central Europe gradually became both an economic and a political burden. Many, both in the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and in the rest of the world, had strong hopes and high expectations for Gorbachev. With the keywords glasnost and perestroika, he spearheaded comprehensive…

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Germany 2009 Part I

Germany 2009 Part I

2009 is the year of political elections and anniversaries in Germany. Europe’s most populous state has conducted presidential, European, federal and chancellor elections. In parallel, Germans in the pretty country have marked “good and bad days” in their collective history. And in the middle of it all, they are trying to find their way out of the biggest financial crisis the world has experienced since the interwar period. At that time, the crisis ended with Hitler taking power in 1933….

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France with a New Course? Part II

France with a New Course? Part II

5: From Africa to the Middle East? In the election campaign, Sarkozy emphasized the need for a new French strategy for Africa. He has followed up, among other things, with a rather sensational speech in Senegal in July 2007. There he argued that Africa’s tragedy is not a result of previous colonial rule and claimed that African farmers lack the will to develop. Thus, Sarkozy denies that France has any responsibility as a former colonial power. It is speculated that…

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France with a New Course? Part I

France with a New Course? Part I

On May 6, 2007, Nicolas Sarkozy was elected President of France for five years. Many claim that he represents something fundamentally new in French politics. The question, however, is whether Sarkozy is really contributing to a radical change in French politics or whether it is more about a change of style. There is little doubt that he differs from his predecessors on both the left and the right. What distinguishes Sarkozy’s government? In what direction is France going under Sarkozy?…

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United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part I

United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part I

“This is a new government with new priorities,” Gordon Brown stressed when he took over as British prime minister after Tony Blair in the autumn of 2007. Six months later, observers are still in the think tank on the direction of the Brown government’s foreign policy. Not least, British foreign policy seems to be determined by far more factors than the Prime Minister alone. What have been the main lines of British foreign policy since World War II? What key…

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United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part II

United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part II

5: The United States – the special relationship Britain’s complicated relationship with its partners in the EU and Europe must undoubtedly be seen in the context of the country’s role as America’s closest European ally. Not only do the United States and the United Kingdom have close ties through common political and economic interests, but the two countries also largely share a common history, culture and language. Winston Churchill was the first to launch the idea of ​​a “special relationship”…

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Attractions in Sweden

Attractions in Sweden

Sweden – places of interest Sweden is a very interesting country, which has a large number of the most diverse attractions to offer. Visit campingship for Top 10 Sights in Sweden. You should definitely not miss the church in Husbay. The church was originally built in the Romanesque style in 1100. Gothic pointed arches were added during the fourteenth century. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the church was renovated, unfortunately thesplendidWall and roof paintings destroyed. Also the church of…

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Hungary History between 1699-1918

Hungary History between 1699-1918

Under Habsburg absolutism (1699-1848) After the Tokaj Kuruc uprising in 1697 and the struggle for freedom (1703–11) under Franz II. Rákóczi, who declared the House of Habsburg deposed in 1707, Emperor Charles VI secured . (1711–40 as Hungarian King Charles III.) In the Peace of Sathmar in 1711 the estates constitution and freedom of religion; In the years that followed, the estates repeatedly asserted their special rights (tax exemption for the nobility, serfdom system). The Peace of Belgrade (1739) established…

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Independent Croatia

Independent Croatia

From the end of the 1980s, Croatia opened up to political pluralism and introduced elements of the market economy. Since the spring of 1989, the Croatian leadership has increasingly distanced itself from the “Yugoserbian” majorization policy of the Serbian Communist Party leader S. Milošević. On the basis of a new electoral law (December 1989; amended in 1992 and 1995), the first free elections in Croatia after 1945 took place on April 23 and May 6, 1990; the Croatian Democratic Community…

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Travel to Finland

Travel to Finland

Area: 338,448 km² Residents: 5,503,000 (December 31, 2016) Population density: 16 E / km² Form of Government: Parliamentary republic System of Government: Parliamentary democracy Neighboring countries: Sweden, Norway, Russia Capital: Helsinki National languages: Finnish, Swedish Religions: 79% Protestant Lutheran, 1% Orthodox, 0.36% Jehovah’s Witnesses Currency: Euro Telephone area code: +358 Time zone:UTC + 2, UTC + 3 (March – October) In 2020, 407 Germans officially emigrated to Finland and 199 returned to their homeland. Within the 10 years from 2010 to 2019, 3,541 Germans officially emigrated to Finland and 2,583 moved back to Germany. In…

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Travel to Kosovo

Travel to Kosovo

Kosovo is a country in south-eastern Europe. It is located inland in the center of the Balkan Peninsula. Kosovo borders Albania in the southwest, Montenegro in the northwest, Serbia in the north and east, and Macedonia in the southeast. Visit rctoysadvice for Kosovo Travel Overview. The country is surrounded by several mountain ranges: the Sarbergs rise in the south and southeast, the Kopaonikberge in the north. The southwest and central region in Kosovo is also mountainous, in the southwest is the…

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Golden Sands, Bulgaria

Golden Sands, Bulgaria

Bulgaria lies in south-east Europe and borders with Romania in the north, Serbia and Macedonia in the west, and Greece and Turkey in the south. In the east, the Black Sea forms the natural state border. The mountains of the Balkans criss- cross the country all the way to the beaches at the Black Sea. The capital of the republic is Sofia. Culture, art and customs have a long tradition in Bulgaria. The architecture of the capital Sofia dates back…

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France Territory

France Territory

TERRITORY: HYDROGRAPHY This mosaic of physical regions, well defined structurally and morphologically, acquires a more precise identification considering the hydrography. The French hydrographic network is in fact remarkably articulated. There are four main river basins: three of them, those of the Seine, the Loire and the Garonne, largely comprise the France of the ancient reliefs, facing the Atlantic (also including the English Channel); one, that of the Rhone, develops between the Alps and the Massif Central tributing to the Mediterranean…

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EU Organizations

EU Organizations

The European council Previously known as ECSC according to phonejust, the EU’s highest governing body is the European Council, or the summit as it is called in everyday life. This is where the heads of state and government of the member states meet to draw up the major political guidelines that ministers and officials will then implement. The European Council meets at least four times a year. Once upon a time, there were relatively simple meetings between six, seven or…

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