South Korea Facts

South Korea Facts

Here you can find a number of practical information in connection with trips to South Korea. Read i.a. about visa rules, price level and travel insurance Language: Korean Capital: Seoul Population: 49 million Religion: Buddhism, Christianity Currency: won Surface: 100 210 km² Worth knowing Before departure About a week before departure, you will receive your final departure letter. The departure letter contains important information about the place and time of departure. It also contains a telephone and address list of…

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Mozambique Education and History

Mozambique Education and History

National symbols The national flag was adopted in 1983. It is horizontally striped in green, black and yellow, narrow white stripes separate the colored stripes from one another. From the leech there is a red triangle over the stripe; in the middle of it is an open book on a yellow five-pointed star, on which the pick and the rifle cross. The constitution describes the meaning of the colors: green symbolizes the fertile soil, black the continent and its population,…

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Travel to Russia

Travel to Russia

The street musicians add energetic background music to the performance of the jokes, the lines of the cartoonists and the sellers who heel old uniforms, Soviet nostalgia and copies of Russian painting. On the side streets starting from Moscow’s longest pedestrian street, it smells of potato-filled pies and steaming hot beetroot soup, and the big department stores sell Gucci, Prada and other western brands. Much has changed in Russia, but here you can still experience not just one but several…

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Belarus Politics and Education

Belarus Politics and Education

Politics According to the constitution adopted on March 15, 1994 (revised several times), Belarus is a presidential republic. The head of state and commander-in-chief of the armed forces is the president, who is directly elected for a period of 5 years (one-time re-election possible). If none of the candidates receives an absolute majority in the first ballot, a runoff vote between the two most successful applicants is required in the second. A minimum participation of 50% is planned for both…

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Japan Economy

Japan Economy

In the nineties, many elements intervened to upset the equilibrium that had been taking shape: first of all, the competition now openly exercised by the first among the NIC (South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore), which had greatly improved the technological quality of their products while maintaining their competitiveness, and the explosion of the Chinese economy, with GDP growth rates ten times higher than those of Japan, in the meantime much reduced. Started with the outflow of labor flows, often…

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Tunisia Economy

Tunisia Economy

ECONOMY: GENERAL INFORMATION Tunisia inherited a modern production structure from the French colonial period. After having adhered in the years immediately following independence (1956) to a clearly socialist orientation of economic development, starting from 1970 the country made an almost total change in its programmatic choices. By appealing widely to foreign capital, the government focused its utmost efforts on encouraging industry, building large public utility infrastructures and enhancing tourism. The result of these policies was a relative economic dynamism which,…

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Krakow, Poland

Krakow, Poland

Who the pearl of Poland to get to know is just right in Krakow. The city is the third largest city in the country and is considered the second largest science and cultural center in Poland. In the past time, Krakow was the capital of Poland for a long time, but also the seat of kings and coronation city. Krakow was declared a bishopric as early as 1000. In 1925 the city was promoted to the Archdiocese of Krakow. The…

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The Pope against the Populists Part II

The Pope against the Populists Part II

Opposite this is the pope’s many calls for hospitality and compassion for the refugees who came from another world. “We must open our eyes to their suffering, and free ourselves from our numbness when they, our brothers and sisters, arrive on our shores. Sending them back across the sea is a declaration of war, “said Pope Francis during a service. And on Twitter, the pope wrote: “Every stranger who knocks on our door gives us an opportunity to meet Christ.”…

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The Pope against the Populists Part I

The Pope against the Populists Part I

The pope’s fight against xenophobia has brought him to the brink of right-wing populist leaders. But does he have the support of the Catholics? Why do many people consider Pope Francis controversial? What do the pope and the Italian government disagree on? How is the Vatican affected by right-wing populism in Catholic countries? The Catholic Church is the world’s largest denomination, with nearly 1.3 billion members – around 17.5 percent of the world’s population. The current head of the church…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part III

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part III

As mentioned, the United Kingdom also wants to avoid the creation of an external border with physical checkpoints between Northern Ireland and the rest of Ireland, which will continue to be part of the EUas defined on timedictionary.com. This is important for economic reasons, as much trade takes place across this border, but also politically and security-wise, as it may challenge the peace agreement negotiated between Northern Ireland, Ireland and the United Kingdom in 1998. The EU has agreed to…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part II

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part II

The collaboration has developed in stages and through sometimes difficult negotiations. The process can in many ways be summed up by the fact that the collaboration has developed in breadth and depth: In the breadth of the fact that more and more policy areas have been incorporated into the collaboration. In depth, the Member States have transferred authority to the EU in some areas. As more policy areas have been incorporated into the co-operation, it has also been opened up…

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That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part I

That is Why Brexit is so Difficult Part I

In just one year, ten countries joined the EU. The UK has now spent three years trying to opt out. Now the deadlock has caused the Prime Minister to withdraw. Why should it be so twisted? Why did the British choose to leave the EU? Why does it take so long to sign up? What does Brexit mean for the EU, and thus further cooperation in Europe? In a referendum in June 2016, the British voted for Britain to leave…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part IV

Germany after the 2009 Election Part IV

The mood in the EU was also weak in the autumn of 2005 after the French and Dutch had voted down the draft treaty treaty and the EU’s heads of state and government had failed to give the union a new long-term budget. At its first EU summit, Merkel managed to compromise on a long-term budget that both large and small EU countries could accept. During a very well-prepared German EU presidency in the spring of 2007, the Germans managed…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part III

Germany after the 2009 Election Part III

6: Stabilization, control and energy policy Merkel and the Grand Coalition went out early with government stabilization measures after the financial crisis unfolded in full from the autumn of 2008. Among other things, the German state quickly guaranteed all deposits in all German banks. This was criticized by other countries, who feared that many would move their bank deposits to German banks. Merkel also tried to support the German car industry by allowing the state to allocate large sums to…

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part II

Germany after the 2009 Election Part II

Most parties are therefore increasingly fighting for the group that brought the German SPD back to power after 16 years in opposition in 1998 (under Chancellor Gerhard Schröder and the now defeated Steinmeier leadership): Die neue Mitte. However, voters in the “new center” do not reflect the Social Democrats’ traditional corps of voters. The SPD’s natural voters were the 20th century industrial proletariat with its political program welfare state, trade union rights and income equalization for trade unionized industrial workers….

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Germany after the 2009 Election Part I

Germany after the 2009 Election Part I

In a year full of anniversaries and celebrations, German voters have also gone to the polls – on several occasions. It is as if one of democracy’s foremost expressions – free elections – is contrasted with a backdrop of a German history with strong expressions to the contrary. Which political forces won during this year’s many elections? What do the elections mean for German politics and the economy in the future? What are the characteristics of German foreign and security…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part I

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part I

How can the economy of a developed nation collapse in a matter of days. How can a country that is rich one day, the next day have to seek help from its neighbors to secure the import of necessary goods? This happened in Iceland in the days 6. – 8. October 2008. There are explanations. Adam Smith – the father of market liberalism – was concerned as early as 1772. He called what has now happened “overtrading” and did not…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part II

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part II

In the autumn of 2007, the first signs came that a major crisis was brewing in the world economy. Share prices on stock exchanges around the world plummeted, but they recovered in most places. This did not apply to the stock exchange in Reykjavik, where the bank shares accounted for 80 per cent of the total share capital. The Icelandic bank bubble was about to burst. Foreign banks and investors wanted their money back, the krone exchange rate fell more…

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Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part III

Iceland from Volcano to Ash Part III

Against promises of high interest rates, for example, 450,000 private individuals in England, the Netherlands and Germany deposited their savings in accounts in Landsbanki’s online bank IceSave. Many were tempted by similarly high interest rates on Kaupthing Edge. In addition, 108 municipalities in England used IceSave, plus a number of police districts, hospitals and foundations. Much of this is lost money, because in retrospect it turned out that the Icesave not had any deposit guarantee in European countries – only…

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Germany 2009 Part III

Germany 2009 Part III

5: The dam burst On November 9, 1989, the dam burst. Politburo member Schabowski chatted – apparently due to confusion in the state leadership – when he at a press conference broadcast live on television to answer questions about exit rights. He interpreted the text on a note he had brought with him – after having been heavily beaten on the blade – as meaning that departure should apply without conditions – and with immediate effect. The time was 18.53….

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Germany 2009 Part II

Germany 2009 Part II

In addition, the fall in oil prices in 1986 hit the raw material supplier the Soviet Union hard. For the new leader of the Communist bloc, support for the aging and reform-minded communist leaders in Eastern and Central Europe gradually became both an economic and a political burden. Many, both in the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and in the rest of the world, had strong hopes and high expectations for Gorbachev. With the keywords glasnost and perestroika, he spearheaded comprehensive…

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Germany 2009 Part I

Germany 2009 Part I

2009 is the year of political elections and anniversaries in Germany. Europe’s most populous state has conducted presidential, European, federal and chancellor elections. In parallel, Germans in the pretty country have marked “good and bad days” in their collective history. And in the middle of it all, they are trying to find their way out of the biggest financial crisis the world has experienced since the interwar period. At that time, the crisis ended with Hitler taking power in 1933….

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France with a New Course? Part II

France with a New Course? Part II

5: From Africa to the Middle East? In the election campaign, Sarkozy emphasized the need for a new French strategy for Africa. He has followed up, among other things, with a rather sensational speech in Senegal in July 2007. There he argued that Africa’s tragedy is not a result of previous colonial rule and claimed that African farmers lack the will to develop. Thus, Sarkozy denies that France has any responsibility as a former colonial power. It is speculated that…

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France with a New Course? Part I

France with a New Course? Part I

On May 6, 2007, Nicolas Sarkozy was elected President of France for five years. Many claim that he represents something fundamentally new in French politics. The question, however, is whether Sarkozy is really contributing to a radical change in French politics or whether it is more about a change of style. There is little doubt that he differs from his predecessors on both the left and the right. What distinguishes Sarkozy’s government? In what direction is France going under Sarkozy?…

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United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part I

United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part I

“This is a new government with new priorities,” Gordon Brown stressed when he took over as British prime minister after Tony Blair in the autumn of 2007. Six months later, observers are still in the think tank on the direction of the Brown government’s foreign policy. Not least, British foreign policy seems to be determined by far more factors than the Prime Minister alone. What have been the main lines of British foreign policy since World War II? What key…

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United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part II

United Kingdom: Foreign Policy Crossroads? Part II

5: The United States – the special relationship Britain’s complicated relationship with its partners in the EU and Europe must undoubtedly be seen in the context of the country’s role as America’s closest European ally. Not only do the United States and the United Kingdom have close ties through common political and economic interests, but the two countries also largely share a common history, culture and language. Winston Churchill was the first to launch the idea of ​​a “special relationship”…

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Best Travel Time and Climate for Sri Lanka

Best Travel Time and Climate for Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is an island in the Indian Ocean off the southeastern tip of India. The country is mostly flat, in the southern central region there are mountains that are over 2,438 meters high. The Sinhalese are the largest ethnic group in Sri Lanka today. Tamils ​​are the second largest ethnic group on the island. Until 1972 the country was called Ceylon. It was occupied by the Portuguese in 1505. Then the Dutch India Company seized power and from 1796…

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Ecuador Economy

Ecuador Economy

ECONOMY: AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, LIVESTOCK AND FISHING According to smber, it is in the agricultural sector which is particularly felt the lack of incisive state reforms, although since 1976 have been subject to gradual confiscation of all large estates that were not cultivated for more than 80% of their surface and the five-year development plan for 1980- 84 has devoted most of the investments to the modernization of agriculture and the construction of adequate irrigation works: approx. 59.8%. of land classified…

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Myanmar History Timeline

Myanmar History Timeline

Burma; officially the country is called in English: “Republic of the Union of Myanmar” (translated means: Myanmar Union Republic ); formerly officially: “the Union of Myanmar” and before that: “the Union of Burma”. According to Ehistorylib, the country is a federal state or union in Southeast Asia with borders to Bangladesh and India in the west, China in the northeast, Laos in the east and Thailand in the southeast. The country has over 2,000 km of coastline towards the Andaman…

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Places to Visit in Malaysia

Places to Visit in Malaysia

According to mathgeneral, Malaysia is the melting pot of cultures in the heart of Southeast Asia! Discover the Malaysian peninsula as well as the island of Borneo on this 16-day varied trip. Travel from the metropolis of Kuala Lumpur through the fascinating landscape of the Cameron Highlands to the historic colonial cities of Malacca and Penang. On Borneo you can expect fascinating insights into the rainforest and a colorful kaleidoscope of different cultures. Day 1 Getting there A scheduled flight…

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